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Learner Reviews & Feedback for World Design for Video Games by California Institute of the Arts

4.4
532 Bewertungen
134 Bewertungen

Über den Kurs

Start creating your world. A game world is not just a backdrop for your game—be it minimal or detailed, contained or part of a much bigger universe, it provides the context for your player. Ultimately, a game world should feel alive and wholly unique to any player who will experience it. In this course, we will explore game worlds in existing games and study the art and influences that inform their themes and styles. We will also investigate key components of environment and level design as well as strategies designers use to define gameplay or advance it. We’ll also look at navigation and the elements that make your world as real (or unreal) as you want it to be. A weekly challenge will prompt you to explore styles and inspirations for possible game worlds, and you’ll learn effective ways to communicate your ideas from concepts to presentation-worthy proofs of concept....

Top-Bewertungen

RC

Jan 23, 2019

I'm not a effective learner so I can't get much from it, but I certainly learn some rules for building world, I would review these contents some days, thank you so much for your teaching!

TT

Feb 07, 2018

The videos are nice and clear, and I love seeing examples for the homework, it really helped. I also loved reviewing my peers and having them review me, they had awesome ideas!

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126 - 126 of 126 Reviews for World Design for Video Games

von Reinier d B

Apr 03, 2016

I learned next to nothing from this course; the professor just rambles on and on jumping schizophrenically from aspect of aspect. One moment he's talking about physics, and in the same sentence he's suddenly talking about whether the game should have a crafting system. Some of the information even seems out of touch.

He doesn't state any information with certainty because he always tends to add "or not!" or "...maybe!" after sentences, leaving you to wonder if there's anything left to take away from the lessons. The entire course could be condensed down into a "list of questions to think about while designing your game world" - it really doesn't contain anything more than that.

Sometimes entire segments are dedicated to trivial things (such as "your game could have invisible walls!"), whereas in other segments he works through a hundred different questions without going in-depth to any of them.

Speaker is hard to understand due to his lack of proficiency with the English language and the subtitles are often incorrect.

On the plus side, you will learn what a "ha-ha" is.