Über diesen Kurs
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Stufe „Anfänger“

Ca. 13 Stunden zum Abschließen

Empfohlen: 6 Modules; 2-3 hours of study per module...

Englisch

Untertitel: Englisch

100 % online

Beginnen Sie sofort und lernen Sie in Ihrem eigenen Tempo.

Flexible Fristen

Setzen Sie Fristen gemäß Ihrem Zeitplan zurück.

Stufe „Anfänger“

Ca. 13 Stunden zum Abschließen

Empfohlen: 6 Modules; 2-3 hours of study per module...

Englisch

Untertitel: Englisch

Lehrplan - Was Sie in diesem Kurs lernen werden

Woche
1
1 Stunde zum Abschließen

Introduction to the course

In this module Professor Duncan Pritchard welcomes you to the course and gives you a preview of our journey together over the next six weeks....
2 Videos (Gesamt 7 min), 4 Lektüren
2 Videos
Professor Duncan Pritchard introduces the course3m
4 Lektüren
About this course10m
Course assessments and exercises10m
Course textbook10m
Introductory Reading: Faith and Rationality10m
1 Stunde zum Abschließen

Mind, Science, and Religion

Dr. Sarah Lane Ritchie starts us off with a tour of the relationship between the various brain sciences and religious belief....
5 Videos (Gesamt 27 min), 2 Lektüren, 3 Quiz
5 Videos
Lecture 1.2: Religious Belief and Embodiment4m
Lecture 1.3: Neural Correlates of Religious Belief7m
Lecture 1.4: Religious Belief and the Cognitive Science of Religion8m
Lecture 1.5: Religious Belief Disproved?3m
2 Lektüren
Introductory Reading: Does Contemporary Neuroscience Debunk Religious Belief?10m
Find out more...!10m
3 praktische Übungen
Test your understanding4m
Test your understanding2m
Module Quiz6m
Woche
2
1 Stunde zum Abschließen

Science and Religion in the Public Realm

In this series of lectures, Professor John Evans describes a sociological approach to the question of religion and science that focuses on contemporary society. Using debates about fact claims and morality of human evolution as his continuing example, and with a focus on the relationship with science that religious and other citizens have with science, he describes three types of conflict. Unlike the philosophical and theological debate that focuses upon conflict over knowledge claims about the physical world, Evans shows how the contemporary debate for citizens is more likely to be about morality. ...
5 Videos (Gesamt 45 min), 1 Lektüre, 6 Quiz
5 Videos
Lecture 2.2 - Possible conflict between religion and science4m
Lecture 2.3 - Official Christian stances on the conflict9m
Lecture 2.4 - Views on human origins12m
Lecture 2.5 - Is the religious public in moral conflict with science?9m
1 Lektüre
Religion and Science: Beyond the Epistemological Conflict Narrative10m
6 praktische Übungen
Test your understanding4m
Test your understanding2m
Test your understanding2m
Test your understanding4m
Module Quiz6m
Assess the reading critically10m
Woche
3
2 Stunden zum Abschließen

Religious Disagreement and Friendly Theism/Atheism

In this series of lectures Professor John Greco discusses the topic of religious disagreement. Part One considers two problems that we find in the epistemology of religion: The Problem of Evil (or Suffering) and The Problem of Divine Hiddenness. In these contexts, theists and atheists often accuse each other of irrationality. Even worse, each party of the debate explains that irrationality by positing some moral or intellectual flaw in the other. The basic idea is this: If you don’t see things the way I do, that must be due to some intellectual or moral flaw in you. Part Two introduces resources in social epistemology that help us to understand what is going on here. The main idea is that social location affects epistemic position-- that social location matters, epistemically speaking. This is a central lesson of contemporary social epistemology, and one that can be fruitfully adopted by religious epistemology as well. Part Three explores some further implications of a “social religious epistemology.” Most importantly, we see how moral and practical aspects of the social environment can have epistemic consequences....
4 Videos (Gesamt 47 min), 3 Lektüren, 4 Quiz
4 Videos
Lecture 3.2 - Social epistemology23m
Lecture 3.3 - Implications for religious epistemology9m
Lecture 3.4 - Conclusion3m
3 Lektüren
Introductory Reading: Are Theism and Atheism Totally Opposed?10m
Further reading10m
Testimony and the Transmission of Religious Knowledge10m
4 praktische Übungen
Test your understanding!6m
Test your understanding!6m
Module Quiz6m
Assess the reading critically2m
Woche
4
4 Stunden zum Abschließen

The Hiddenness Argument and the Contribution of Philosophy

In this series of lectures, Professor John Schellenberg introduces and explains a new argument for atheism known as the hiddenness argument. He highlights the self-imposed limitations of this way of reasoning, which is aimed at ruling out just one candidate for the status of a divine reality, the notion of a personal divine. He then clarifies the relations between this approach to the question of God's existence and other features of the contemporary landscape in philosophy and science – including the philosophical problem of evil, certain results of the cognitive science of religion, and recent moral changes suggesting cultural evolution....
5 Videos (Gesamt 41 min), 2 Lektüren, 6 Quiz
5 Videos
Lecture 4.2 - Main objections to the argument6m
Lecture 4.3 - Responses to the objections14m
Lecture 4.4 - The relationship between religion and science7m
Lecture 4.5 - Philosophy's contribution to the theism debates5m
2 Lektüren
Introductory Reading: Is God Hidden, Or Does God Simply Not Exist?10m
Divine Hiddenness and Human Philosophy10m
5 praktische Übungen
Test your understanding6m
Test your understanding2m
Module Quiz6m
Test your understanding4m
Assess the reading critically2m
Woche
5
4 Stunden zum Abschließen

Religious and Scientific Fundamentalism

In this series of lectures Dr. Rik Peels considers religious and scientific fundamentalism. Scientism is the currently popular thesis that only natural science gives rational belief or, alternatively, that there are no principled limits to science. In this lecture, I give several examples of scientism, such as scientism about free will. After that, I present seven reasons that have been given for scientism. Subsequently, I outline three arguments against it. Finally, I explain some crucial similarities and differences between scientism on the one hand and fundamentalism on the other. I argue that, even though some varieties of scientism resemble fundamentalism, most of them are more similar to religions or worldviews....
6 Videos (Gesamt 70 min), 4 Lektüren, 6 Quiz
6 Videos
Lecture 5.2 - Varieties of scientism9m
Lecture 5.3 - Arguments for scientism10m
Lecture 5.4 - Arguments for scientism (continued)10m
Lecture 5.5 - Arguments against scientism15m
Lecture 5.6 - Scientism, religious belief, and fundamentalism13m
4 Lektüren
The Folly of Scientism10m
Is Fundamentalism Just a Problem for Religious People?10m
The Fundamental Argument Against Scientism10m
A Conceptual Map of Scientism10m
5 praktische Übungen
Test your understanding2m
Test your understanding2m
Test your understanding2m
Test your understanding6m
Module quiz6m
Woche
6
1 Stunde zum Abschließen

Epistemic Virtues and Vices in Science and Religion

In this lecture, Professor Mark Alfano discusses the role of epistemic virtues and vices in science and religion. The lecture has three main sections. First, Alfano distinguishes four types of epistemic virtues and vices. Source virtues such as honesty make someone an excellent primary source of knowledge. Receiver virtues such as intellectual humility make someone an excellent recipient of knowledge provided by sources. Conduit virtues make someone an excellent conveyor of the knowledge they receive from others to third parties; these dispositions might include a willingness to gossip carefully in order to protect others from a sexual predator, as well as the virtues that journalists try to embody. Echo virtues make someone an excellent sounding board for others. Along the way, Alfano mentions various vices that can attach to people in the role of source, receiver, conduit, and echo. In the second part of the lecture, Alfano uses the notions of source, receiver, conduit, and echo virtues to make sense of scientific collaborations and trust in science by laypeople. In section three, he shows that unless we have unreasonably high credence in very long chains of conduit virtues, we should not accept testimony in favour of miracles or divine revelation....
6 Videos (Gesamt 51 min), 1 Lektüre, 4 Quiz
6 Videos
Lecture 6.2 - Introduction to epistemic virtues and vices17m
Lecture 6.3 - Case studies from science: scientific collaborations4m
Lecture 6.4 - Case studies from science: trust and distrust of science by laypeople9m
Lecture 6.5 - Case studies from religion: miracles7m
Lecture 6.6 - Case studies from religion: transmission of revelation7m
1 Lektüre
Further reading: Virtues For Agents in Directed Social Networks10m
4 praktische Übungen
Test your understanding2m
Test your understanding4m
Test your understanding4m
Module quiz8m
4.6
41 BewertungenChevron Right

20%

ziehen Sie für Ihren Beruf greifbaren Nutzen aus diesem Kurs

Top-Bewertungen

von CWJun 10th 2018

This was a first class course in all respects. The calibre of the lecturers was very high indeed and they all made the material very accessible.

von EMDec 8th 2017

Refreshing to be updated with the latest developments in epistemology and philosophy of religion among others.

Dozenten

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Dr Orestis Palermos

Research Explorer
School of Philosophy
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Dr Mark Harris

Senior Lecturer in Science and Religion
School of Divinity
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Professor Duncan Pritchard

Professor of Philosophy
University of Edinburgh
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Dr J Adam Carter

Researcher
Epistemology - Philosphy

Über The University of Edinburgh

Influencing the world since 1583, The University of Edinburgh is consistently ranked as one of the world's top 50 universities. Today, we are an established and global leader in online learning, providing degree-level education to 3,000 online students in addition to 36,000 students on-campus. We also offer a wide range of free online courses in a variety of subjects. To find out more about studying for one of our online degrees, search for ‘Edinburgh online’ or visit www.ed.ac.uk/studying/online-learning/postgraduate ...

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